Course: Vaccines

Course:    Vaccines

Modality: Online  |  Duration: 1 Hour
 

In this course, you will learn about the importance of getting vaccinated. You will also learn about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines and the requirements associated with getting vaccinated.

Skills and Learning Objectives

  • Describe the importance of getting vaccinated.

  • Describe the safety and effectiveness of getting vaccines.

  • Describe vaccine requirements and expectations.

  • Describe available resources to help a client who gets a vaccine.

Language

If you would like to have audio narration of this course in order to have it read aloud to you, you can add the Chrome Screen Reader feature to your web browser for free by clicking on this link:
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Course Outline

Pretest- Time estimate: 10 min

Introduction: Vaccines - Time estimate: 5 min

Introduction

Learning Objective(s): N/A

Activities and Resources

•    Presentation: Course overview and objectives

Lesson 1: The Importance of Vaccines - Time estimate: 13 min

Lesson 1: The Importance of Vaccines - Time estimate: 13 min

What are vaccines and their benefits?

Learning Objective(s): 1a, 1b, 1g

Activities and Resources

•    Presentation: Introduction to vaccines, vaccinations, and immunizations
•    Knowledge check: Match  terms and definitions
•    Presentation: Explain why vaccines are needed throughout life and their benefits
•    Activity: Given an example, select the appropriate reason vaccines are needed

How vaccines work and disease prevention

Learning Objective(s): 1c, 1f

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: How vaccines work to prevent diseases

  • Knowledge check: Select individual and community protections against diseases

  • Knowledge check: Given examples, select preventable diseases that may create the most risk for caregivers and their clients

Why people don't get vaccines

Learning Objective(s): 1d

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Common reasons people choose not to get vaccinated

  • Activity: Correctly identify personal and religious beliefs associated with vaccination decisions

The risks of not getting vaccines

Learning Objective(s): 1e, 1f, 1g

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: The risks of delaying or skipping vaccines 

  • Knowledge check: Correctly select a risk of delaying vaccines 

  • Presentation: Vaccine-preventable diseases

  • Knowledge check: Correctly identify vaccine-preventable diseases that create risks to caregivers and clients

Communicating the importance of getting vaccinated

Learning Objective(s): 1c, 1e, 1g, 1h

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Explain the importance of caregivers becoming vaccinated

  • Knowledge check: Identify caregiver risk of exposure to serious diseases

Lesson 2: Safety and Effectiveness - Time estimate: 7 min

Lesson 1: The Importance of Vaccines - Time estimate: 13 min

Vaccine safety

Learning Objective(s): 2a

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Important things to know about vaccine safety.

  • Activity: Given examples, identify safeguards to ensure vaccines are safe. 

Vaccine development and approval

Learning Objective(s): 2b

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: The development and approval process used to vaccines

  • Knowledge check: Select appropriate examples of the FDA’s vaccine approval process 

Vaccine monitoring system

Learning Objective(s): 2c

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Safety monitoring system for vaccines 

  • Knowledge check: Select the appropriate way to report vaccine side effects

Vaccine effectiveness

Learning Objective(s): 2d

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: The effectiveness of vaccines

  • Knowledge check: Correctly identify vaccine effectiveness
     

Lesson 3: Preparing for Vaccine - Time estimate: 12 min

Lesson 1: The Importance of Vaccines - Time estimate: 13 min

Who gets vaccinated

Learning Objective(s): 3a, 3b

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Who should and should not get vaccinated

  • Knowledge check: Given scenarios, select who should and should not get vaccinated

Vaccine Appointment

Learning Objective(s): 3c, 3d

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: How to prepare for a vaccine appointment

  • Activity: Model how to prepare for a vaccine appointment

  • Presentation: What to expect during a vaccine appointment

  • Knowledge check: Identify important considerations to report before getting vaccinated

  • Activity: Given examples, identify tips to stay calm during a vaccine appointment

Vaccination side effects

Learning Objective(s): 3e, 3f, 3g

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Signs and symptoms of vaccine side effects

  • Knowledge check: Model how to identify vaccine side effects

  • Presentation: Responding to mild and unusual vaccine side effects

  • Knowledge check: Identify how to respond to mild and unusual vaccine side effects

  • Activity: Identify steps to respond to severe vaccine reactions

Caretaker as vaccine role model

Learning Objective(s): 3h

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: How you can help a client understand vaccines 

  • Knowledge check: Identify the role you play in helping a client understand vaccines.

Communicating the importance of getting vaccinated

Learning Objective(s): 1c, 1e, 1g, 1h

Activities and Resources

  • Presentation: Explain the importance of caregivers becoming vaccinated

  • Knowledge check: Identify caregiver risk of exposure to serious diseases

Lesson 4: Vaccine Resources - Time estimate: 3 min

Resources

Learning Objective(s): 4a

Activities and Resources

  • Resource links: List of available resources

Posttest - Time estimate: 10 min

Key Terms

  • Antibodies - Protective substances made by the body's immune system in response to antigens.

  • Antigens - Substances inside or outside the body (including chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and pollen) that the immune system does not recognize and so produces antibodies to fight them off.

  • Herd Immunity (also community immunity or herd protection) - Indirect protection against an infectious disease for people who are not immune because most of the population is immune (through vaccination or other means).

  • Immunity - Protection from an infectious disease. If you are immune to a disease, you can be exposed to it without becoming infected.

  • Immunization - A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. It is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

  • Vaccination - The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce protection from a specific disease.

  • Vaccine - A product that stimulates an immune response to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Vaccines are usually administered through needle injections but can be administered by mouth or sprayed into the nose.

  • Vaccine efficacy - The percentage of reduction in disease occurrence in a vaccinated group compared to an unvaccinated group in carefully controlled trials.

References

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https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/causes-transmission.html

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, January 25). Shingles vaccination.

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/public/shingrix/index.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fvaccines%2Fvpd%2Fshingles%2Fpublic%2Findex.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/conversations/understanding-vacc-work.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/clinical-info.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/why-vaccinate/risks-delaying-vaccines.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2019, February 28). Tetanus: About tetanus.  https://www.cdc.gov/tetanus/about/index.html
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, May 26). Diphtheria: Symptoms.  https://www.cdc.gov/diphtheria/about/symptoms.html
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https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/history/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, August 7). Pneumococcal vaccination: What everyone should know.

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/public/index.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/monitoring/vaers/index.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/caregivers/faqs.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html

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https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/burden.html

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https://www.jhsph.edu/covid-19/articles/achieving-herd-immunity-with-covid19.html

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https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/vaccines-and-immunization-what-is-vaccination